25 March 2008.
For immediate release.

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Higher Motoring Costs and Global Cooling Ahead
As motorists get a temporary respite from fuel duty hikes, research continues to show that precipitous unilateral and costly action on natural and inevitable climate change is not warranted.
1. Surface temperatures go in the cooler.
A recent paper by Ross McKitrick and Patrick Michaels, published in the Journal of Geophysical Research [1] looked for errors in the global database for near-surface temperatures and concluded: "We apply a battery of model specification tests to rule out spurious correlations and endogeneity bias. We conclude that the data contamination likely leads to an overstatement of actual trends over land. Using the regression model to filter the extraneous, nonclimatic effects reduces the estimated 1980-2002 global average temperature trend over land by about half". This means that 'global warming' has been over-estimated by 100%.
 
2. Atmosphere fails to obey IPCC.
After a period of 30 years during which the troposphere hardly changed its temperature overall - though a prominent natural El Nino event was observed a decade ago - the last five years have seen a FALL in tropical tropospheric temperatures at a time when carbon dioxide emissions and levels have continued to rise.
 
Tropical Troposphere Temperatures
 
3. Oceans fail to heat up as well.
Over a similar 5-year timescale there is another 'mystery of missing global warming': "Some 3,000 scientific robots that are plying the ocean have sent home a puzzling message. These diving instruments suggest that the oceans have not warmed up at all over the past four or five years."
 
NPR — The Mystery of Global Warming's Missing Heat
 
4. Arctic temperature shifts nothing new.
After the fiasco of 'Wrong Way Flanagan' getting trapped in arctic ice after believing global warming propaganda (see e.g. Moonbattery) the ABD offers a reminder that arctic temperature shifts are natural and normal:
 
1922:

1817:
A Royal Society letter to the Admiralty suggesting an expedition to investigate climate change:
"A considerable change of climate, inexplicable at present to us, must have taken place in the Circumpolar Regions, by which the severity of the cold that has for centuries past enclosed the seas in the high northern latitudes in an impenetrable barrier of ice has been, during the last two years, greatly abated. 2000 square leagues of ice with which the Greenland Seas between the latitudes of 74 and 80N have been hitherto covered, has in the last two years, entirely disappeared. The floods, which have the whole summer inundated all those parts of Germany where rivers have their sources in snowy mountains, afford ample proof that new sources of warmth have been opened."
Royal Society, London, Nov. 20, 1817. Minutes of Council, Vol. 8. pp.149-153.
 
5. Cooler world a sure bet
Scientists with an eye on scientific data rather than political rhetoric who made a pecuniary challenge to the false consensus of man-made global warming, are doubtless keeping the other eye on the thermometer as it fails to rise 'by UN diktat'.
 
The Guardian — Climate change sceptics bet $10,000 on cooler world
 
 
With these conclusions and perspectives offering every reason to pause for thought before wasting our share of $75 trillion, probably more, on solving a non-existent problem, the UK motorist is facing the full wrath of hysterical and uninformed Green propaganda. All because cars contribute 16% to the nation's 2% of mankind's 3.4% of global emissions (sources: DEFRA and IPCC) into an atmosphere containing a geologically low concentration of carbon dioxide at 390 ppm - previously the level has been 18 times higher, naturally, with no thermal runaway.
 
If, as one of this country's 30 million driving licence holders, you stopped driving altogether, you could save less than 0.0000000004% of the 0.039% atmospheric carbon dioxide. If this is a sensible notion then we expect another policy initiative shortly that will further lower the temperature of the world by having every child dip an ice lollipop into the tide when they next paddle on a beach - though this approach may prove as unpopular as the extortionate taxes faced by drivers watching the government regularly dipping into their pocket.
 
The Stern report, commissioned by the Government, suggested that £44 per tonne is an appropriate level of taxation for CO2 emissions.
 
Motorists already pay for their carbon at FIVE TIMES the level of the Stern recommendations - in fuel duty. Moreover, our calculation on Congestion Charging proposals shows that London's band G residents would be paying £161,000 per tonne for their extra emissions in central London.
 
ABD PR 610: ABD Welcomes Porsche Challenge to "Vastly Disproportionate" London Emissions Tax
 
There are NO justifiable reasons for further penalties and restrictions on cars and bikers. A significant cut in fuel duty would be in order, based on the Stern Report alone.

 
 
NOTES FOR EDITORS
 
Reference:
 
[1] JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. 112, D24S09, doi:10.1029/2007JD008465, 2007
 
Quantifying the influence of anthropogenic surface processes and inhomogeneities on gridded global climate data
 
Ross R. McKitrick
Department of Economics, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario, Canada
 
Patrick J. Michaels
Cato Institute, Washington, D. C., USA
 
Abstract
Local land surface modification and variations in data quality affect temperature trends in surface-measured data. Such effects are considered extraneous for the purpose of measuring climate change, and providers of climate data must develop adjustments to filter them out. If done correctly, temperature trends in climate data should be uncorrelated with socioeconomic variables that determine these extraneous factors. This hypothesis can be tested, which is the main aim of this paper. Using a new database for all available land-based grid cells around the world we test the null hypothesis that the spatial pattern of temperature trends in a widely used gridded climate data set is independent of socioeconomic determinants of surface processes and data inhomogeneities. The hypothesis is strongly rejected (P = 7.1 10-14), indicating that extraneous (nonclimatic) signals contaminate gridded climate data. The patterns of contamination are detectable in both rich and poor countries and are relatively stronger in countries where real income is growing. We apply a battery of model specification tests to rule out spurious correlations and endogeneity bias. We conclude that the data contamination likely leads to an overstatement of actual trends over land. Using the regression model to filter the extraneous, nonclimatic effects reduces the estimated 1980-2002 global average temperature trend over land by about half.

 
 
Notes for Editors about the ABD